Pop Art Meets the Renaissance: Philipp Rudolf Humm at Riflemaker

In anticipation of Riflemaker‘s upcoming Being and Time, an exhibition of new works by  Philipp Rudolf Humm, we are thrilled to have been able to speak with the Belgian/German artist about his practise.

Humm’s paintings are infused with art history references, in particular of the Renaissance and Pop art. From these  inspirations and other sources, he creates playful mise-en-scènes that allow him to comment on the world around him.

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Indoctrinated, Oil on canvas; 2016. Courtesy of the Artist and Riflemaker.

Humm works in oil, using bold colours and familar scenes. His paintings are both dramatic and fun. We anticipate this exhibition to be a truly exciting and unique event on your art calendar this year

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Art & Music – ‘Rhythm’ at Imitate Modern

In the words of famed contemporary Broadway composer, William Finn, ‘You gotta have heart and music.’ Take out the ‘h’ and the ‘e’ to make ‘art and music’ and I’d argue the phrase still strongly applies. It seems as though the curating team at Imitate Modern would agree as they present Rhythm, a multidisciplinary exhibition opening 31st May at their Piccadilly space.

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Cody Choi, Self Portrait

The show pays homage to the arts in a wider sense with an exciting collection of works featuring musical icons Prince, Bowie, Elvis and Michael Jackson. But aside from portraying real life music artists, the work on view also celebrates the wider purpose of music and rhythm in our lives, reminding us of its’ vitality, universality and great importance.

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Yayoi Kusama Comes to London! An immersive exhibition at Victoria Miro.

Victoria Miro presents a new exhibition by Yayoi Kusama. Spanning the gallery’s three locations and waterside garden, the exhibition features new paintings, pumpkin sculptures, and mirror rooms, all made especially for this presentation.

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MY HEART’S ABODE, 2016.

This is the artist’s most extensive exhibition at the gallery to date, and it is the first time mirror rooms have gone on view in London since Kusama’s major retrospective at Tate Modern in 2012.

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Louis-Nicolas Darbon – ArtAttack Artist of The Week

ArtAttack is proud to present our latest ‘Artist of the Week’, Louis-Nicolas Darbon. Artists of the week are selected by the ArtAttack team from the diverse and eclectic group of artist users on our app.

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Parisian born, London-based artist, menswear & lifestyle blogger, Louis-Nicolas Darbon stands out from the crowd with a mixture of his two worlds of art & fashion colliding, sartorially influencing gentlemen around the globe.

I had the chance to talk to Louis about his career so far, and find out more about his artistic practise.

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A Classic Goes Contemporary: ‘Botticelli Reimagined’ at the V&A

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Ursula Andress as Honey Ryder in ‘Dr. No’, 1962, Directed by Terence Young

What does a Bond girl have to do with a Botticelli? Quite a lot, actually. This is what I realise at the Victoria & Albert Museum’s ‘Botticelli Reimagined’ exhibition, almost as soon as I walk through the door. A large screen is playing a scene from the 1964 Bond film Dr. No, in which Ursula Andress (as the dubiously named ‘Honey Ryder’) emerges from the sea, in the little white number that is now one of the most famous bikinis of all time. Why on earth are we looking at this? Where is the obligatory timeline of Sandro Botticelli’s life, giving us the overview of his developing career, and leading us towards the paintings recognised as the works of one of the greatest Renaissance painters of all time?
It shouldn’t be that unusual to find a reference to a blockbuster film in an art exhibition. We know that popular culture and ‘high’ art aren’t incompatible – that’s what Pop Art was all about, after all. But that’s Pop Art. This is an exhibition about the Renaissance, and Botticelli’s influence on other artists since that time – even if one of them was the ultimate Pop Artist, Andy Warhol – so why not begin at the beginning? Though Honey Ryder does look quite a bit like the Birth of Venus (1482-1485), it feels unusual that she is our mediating guide (along with Uma Thurman, shown on the same screen as Venus in the 1988 film The Adventures of Baron Munchausen) through this trajectory. There is something to be said for the fact Honey Ryder belonged to a moment in history often referred to as the ‘birth of the sexual revolution’ – but isn’t this quite a tenuous link to Venus’ titular birth?

 

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Sandro Botticelli, ‘The Birth of Venus’, 1482-85

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‘‘Art is the most interdisciplinary communication medium available to humans — from mathematician to poet — a piece of art can speak to anyone.’’ ArtAttack meets ‘The Most Famous Artist’

ArtAttack is thrilled to have had the opportunity to interview The Most Famous Artist. Having followed this immensely creative Instagram account for many years, even using certain works as inspiration for university projects, the interview was a real privilege. TMFA is a collective of entrepreneur artists who come together to share, inspire and influence their viewers through various mediums of art as well as to draw focus to how social media influencers can be used to promote art and business. After some research, we discovered some art works on the account belong to the co-founder, Matty Mo, who’s concept to create this collective has caused quite a stir…

the most famous artist screen shot

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‘If you have the talent then it will happen’ – ArtAttack meets Tal Booker

Tal Booker is a digital artist from London who has been exploring various areas of graphic design including fashion design, corporate design and logo design. More recently, Tal has become focused on his digital art which involves the formation of unique and sometimes witty digital prints.

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I had the chance to speak to Tal about his work and the state of London’s emerging art scene.

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Tate Modern: The EY Exhibition ‘The World Goes Pop’ & ‘Blindly’

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ArtAttack visited the Tate Modern today and experienced a rollercoaster of emotions. On the one hand, we viewed an exhibition everyone should see, ‘The EY Exhibition: The World Goes Pop,.’ to develop their minds on traditional Pop Art and its’ relationship with politics, culture and feminism. In complete contrast we were privileged to view an artists’ experiment ‘Blindly,’  a painting workshop with a small group of visually impaired participants. 

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The Broad: Making LA An Art Town

When I think of my hometown, Los Angeles, California, palm trees, expansive beaches and rainbow sunsets come to mind. I start to crave In n’Out Burger, hot pilates and early morning hikes in Runyon Canyon, $20 Juice Served Here smoothies (worth it, I swear) and the ever perfect ‘Trust Me’ menu at Sugarfish. I think of lazy strolls on Abbot Kinney, movie premieres taking over Hollywood Boulevard, hip hop nights at the club and performers on the Venice boardwalk. What I do not think of however, is art.

Now, before you go telling me how LA has a “killer art scene,” yes, of course I realize there is art in LA. From street art on every major boulevard, to Renaissance masterpieces at the Getty, and gallery private views with drinks flowing almost every weekend, by no stretch of the imagination is the City of Angels not a City of Art as well. However, living in London currently and having lived in New York, I never thought of my city as quite up to par with my adopted homes art-wise, at least not until The Broad.

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The Broad, exterior

The Broad has changed everything.

Marketed, quite accurately, as ‘LA’s new contemporary art museum,’ the building, by design firm Diller Scofidio + Renfro, is a piece of art in itself gracing the skyline of Downtown LA. Inside, the vast-beyond-comprehenstion postwar and contemporary collection of philanthropists Eli and Edythe Broad awaits. Just to be transparent, that’s 2,000 works of art collected over the course of 50 years, and including the likes of Jean-Michel Basquiat, Cy Twombly, Keith Haring, Roy Lichtenstein, Andy Warhol, Takashi Murakami, Ed Ruscha, Damien Hirst, Cindy Sherman and Christopher Wool, to name but a few.

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