Lucy Tomlins’ Artwork for Vitrine’s ‘Sculpture At’ Launched Last Night in Bermondsey Square

Last night launched the 2017 edition of Vitrine‘s Sculpture At, presenting in Bermondsey Square, London a new artwork by Lucy Tomlins. Her sculpture, entitled Pylon and Pier will be on view until August 2017. We were thrilled to have the opportunity to speak with Lucy about the work in anticipation of this evening’s official opening.

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The many sides of glass: Flavie Audi at Tristan Hoare

If you ask me, there is nothing that rings in the holiday season more than brightly coloured things that shine. From tree ornaments to jewels to candlelight, Christmas is all about the sparkle, so now that it’s almost December I’d suggest running not walking to Tristan Hoare for their latest exhibition Cell-(estial), a collection of enchanting work by French-born Lebanese artist Flavie Audi.

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Fluid Rock 19, 2016. Blown glass, gold, silver. Courtesy of the Artist and Tristan Hoare.

Audi is best known for her mouthwateringly beautiful gem-like glass sculptures, but for this exhibition she also includes photography and film as a means to investigate the points at which the natural and artificial worlds meet.

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Fluid Rock 16, 2016. Blown glass, gold. Courtesy of the Artist and Tristan Hoare.

 

Glass is a naturally occurring, organic material, yet through its modern usage in mobile and TV screens it has taken on technological significance – as an interface through which real and virtual worlds are mediated – and it is this collision of realities that is at the heart of Audi’s practice. To explore how these realms interact, the show has been divided into two distinct installations, one representing the physical, the other digital, chaotic nature placed alongside the rational and man-made.

We are delighted to have had the opportunity to speak with Audi about this exhibition and her general practise.

Have a read below and then as previously mentioned, get to the gallery immediately!

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An exploration of Science through Art – ArtAttack Interviews David Cheeseman

In anticipation of his upcoming exhibition, Slime Mould Logic, at Tintype Gallery, ArtAttack had the chance to speak with British artist, David Cheeseman.

Cheeseman, born in 1960, brings a fascination for nature and science to his work and was awarded the Gulbenkian Rome Scholarship in Sculpture as well as the The Henry Moore Fellow in Sculpture at Coventry University. Last year he completed a residency at The Lydney Park Estate in association with Matt’s Gallery London and also presented a Fig.2 at the ICA in collaboration with Ole Hagan and astrophysicist Roberto Trotta.

Cheeseman’s prestigious education includes studying painting at Maidstone School of Art and sculpture at the Royal College of Art (RCA). This new show, opening 19th May at Tintype, presents a series of innovative sculptures inspired by one of nature’s true wonders: slime mould.

Slime mould is a generic name for organisms that superficially resemble funghi. The incredible element is that they are able to navigate towards foods or hosts almost as if they have an emergent intelligence.

4 David Cheeseman, Slime Mould Logic, 2016 © David Cheeseman. Courtesy the artist and Tintype .jpg
David Cheeseman, Slime Mould Logic, 2016. c. David Cheeseman. Courtesy of the artist and Tintype.

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‘I want to show society’s excess through a surrealist and dystopian view of what we could become’ – ArtAttack meets Henri Charreau

ArtAttack meets one of London’s most exciting emerging artists, sculptor Henri Charreau. Brought up in Paris, Henri graduated from Chelsea School of Art and is currently doing an MA at Kings College London.

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I had the chance to speak with Henri about his artistic practise and current projects.

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Connecting with Nature — Yiming Min’s UK Debut

Renowned Chinese artist, Yiming Min, will make his UK debut next week with a sculpture and painting exhibition entitled ‘Therefore‘ presented by Very Art Space. The show will usher viewers into a machine-made yet natural world including a large-scale installation, sculptures and a suite of oil paintings.

The inspiration for the works is Yiming’s studio in Xiamen, China, which is located within a natural oasis of trees and wildlife, whilst still only 100 metres away from a bustling port city — the juxtaposition between man and nature informs the work. In his own words, Yiming seeks to examine the “coherence of perception between humanity and the natural world.”

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Markus Karstiess: When Beauty and Abject Bind Together

 

ArtAttack would like to introduce you to renowned German sculptor, Markus KARSTIESS, in anticipation of his second show at Bruce Haines Mayfair opening this week.

The exhibition is comprised of three distinct bodies of work by KARSTIESS.

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 Hannibal Doe, 2009. Ceramic, platinum glaze, white gladioli (Gladiolus) H 65 cm. © Markus Karstieß/ VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2015. Courtesy the artist and Bruce Haines Mayfair

 

The first, his signature memento mori (remember that you can die), reminds us of our mortality and the vanity present in a contemporary society based so strongly on appearances. Living in excess within our consumerist society, we think of ourselves as immortal, like the immortal plastic flowers that flourish in our living rooms come rain or come shine. In these works, KARSTIESS brings us back down to earth, and puts emphasis on our mortality through the hopelessness and beauty of nature; he places a flower inside each vase, which is allowed to naturally perish over time. In this way, the artist reminds us that we as human beings are like real flowers not fake ones; we will one day fade and die. The titles of these vases, all borrowed from the ‘Doe family,’ suggest that they stand as a memorial for the unknown dead that have fallen into the oblivion of our ephemeral memory. The artist’s incredible knowledge of the material and techniques allows him to push the boundaries of the clay, making these deformed organic vases simple, yet significantly disturbing.

 

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